Lessons on Anti-Racist Organizing Across Government and Community

Living Cities works to create systemic change grounded in the understanding that systems and institutions are made up of people. Whether operating on the inside of institutions, or demanding change from the outside, the work of advancing racial equity is all about mobilizing people.

Throughout our work we have seen the impact of people organizing to shift power from a variety of platforms. We recently had the opportunity to talk to two women of color, Maya Wallace and Giovania Tiarachristie, about what it looks like to serve as organizers working both inside and outside of government institutions with the shared focus on advancing racial equity. Maya Wallace currently serves as a Performance Manager for the California Department of Justice and Giovania Tiarachristie, currently a Senior Consultant at Daniel Lim Consulting, previously served as Deputy Director of Neighborhood Planning at New York City Housing Preservation and Development. Below are key lessons that emerged from our conversations.


Wallace

Lesson 1: Ground your work in history.

Both Maya and Giovania emphasized the importance of grounding in their personal histories to inform how they show up in rebuilding the future. After growing up across many cities and countries around the world, Giovania spent many of their early years of life in Pennsylvania. It was there that they became an organizer. Because they had experienced so many ways of living, they showed up to organizing with a recognition that it was important—and possible—to work “differently than a lot of white-led organizations working in communities of color who did not meaningfully engage residents.”

Whether operating on the inside of institutions, or demanding change from the outside, the work of advancing racial equity is all about mobilizing people.

Maya also came to organizing work from a place of deep reflection on her personal history. Growing up as a biracial kid in a conservative-leaning California county that was experiencing demographic shifts, she can recount many personal experiences of racism. Rather than responding with spite, she “learned to focus on trying to build alliances, friendships and relationships with people across the board, and trying to see beyond [the racism].” This tactic has enabled her to be a very effective organizer today.

Lesson 2: Covid-19 is an opportunity for action.

As Maya and Giovania reflected on the impacts of the Covid-19 crisis in their communities, both emphasized the ways that the voices of low income communities of color are ever critical in public sector decision making. In the case of Sacramento, Maya is seeing the city engage communities in ways she hoped they would for some time, but the pandemic elevated it as a priority. Giovania’s experience in New York City suggests that this is an opportune moment for communities of color and allies in government to push elected officials to be more accountable and develop transformative, anti-racist policies and practices.

Lesson 3: Relationships are the currency of change.

Across all aspects of their work, Maya and Giovania recognize the essential nature of building relationships at all levels of the systems they are trying to change. “It’s about understanding the entire network system that you’re working in and maintaining good relationships with as many elements of that network as you can,” Maya said. And that requires organizers spanning government and community “to work on both the systemic and interpersonal levels,” Giovania reflected. While this relationship building work can be complex, Maya and Giovania reminded me that it is also what makes it all worth it.

As they have moved this work forward, both leaders have evolved their understanding of success. “I’m happy if at the end of a process I look around and there are different people at the table than there were when I started,” said Maya. By partnering with folks both inside and outside of the public sector they are working towards a shared vision of government working on behalf of all people. Giovania reflected in conclusion that they have intentionally decided to work in the public sector in order to “transform the way government works with communities of color, in a way that allows them to identify their vision, support them in achieving collective goals, and co-develop policies and practices that work towards equity and justice.” Our hope is that our network of public servants can emulate these approaches to advance policy and practice that shifts power and creates more racially equitable communities.

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Lessons on Anti-Racist Organizing Across Government and Community

Living Cities works to create systemic change grounded in the understanding that systems and institutions are made up of people. Whether operating on the inside of institutions, or demanding change from the outside, the work of advancing racial equity is all about mobilizing people.

Throughout our work we have seen the impact of people organizing to shift power from a variety of platforms. We recently had the opportunity to talk to two women of color, Maya Wallace and Giovania Tiarachristie, about what it looks like to serve as organizers working both inside and outside of government institutions with the shared focus on advancing racial equity. Maya Wallace currently serves as a Performance Manager for the California Department of Justice and Giovania Tiarachristie, currently a Senior Consultant at Daniel Lim Consulting, previously served as Deputy Director of Neighborhood Planning at New York City Housing Preservation and Development. Below are key lessons that emerged from our conversations.


Wallace

Lesson 1: Ground your work in history.

Both Maya and Giovania emphasized the importance of grounding in their personal histories to inform how they show up in rebuilding the future. After growing up across many cities and countries around the world, Giovania spent many of their early years of life in Pennsylvania. It was there that they became an organizer. Because they had experienced so many ways of living, they showed up to organizing with a recognition that it was important—and possible—to work “differently than a lot of white-led organizations working in communities of color who did not meaningfully engage residents.”

Whether operating on the inside of institutions, or demanding change from the outside, the work of advancing racial equity is all about mobilizing people.

Maya also came to organizing work from a place of deep reflection on her personal history. Growing up as a biracial kid in a conservative-leaning California county that was experiencing demographic shifts, she can recount many personal experiences of racism. Rather than responding with spite, she “learned to focus on trying to build alliances, friendships and relationships with people across the board, and trying to see beyond [the racism].” This tactic has enabled her to be a very effective organizer today.

Lesson 2: Covid-19 is an opportunity for action.

As Maya and Giovania reflected on the impacts of the Covid-19 crisis in their communities, both emphasized the ways that the voices of low income communities of color are ever critical in public sector decision making. In the case of Sacramento, Maya is seeing the city engage communities in ways she hoped they would for some time, but the pandemic elevated it as a priority. Giovania’s experience in New York City suggests that this is an opportune moment for communities of color and allies in government to push elected officials to be more accountable and develop transformative, anti-racist policies and practices.

Lesson 3: Relationships are the currency of change.

Across all aspects of their work, Maya and Giovania recognize the essential nature of building relationships at all levels of the systems they are trying to change. “It’s about understanding the entire network system that you’re working in and maintaining good relationships with as many elements of that network as you can,” Maya said. And that requires organizers spanning government and community “to work on both the systemic and interpersonal levels,” Giovania reflected. While this relationship building work can be complex, Maya and Giovania reminded me that it is also what makes it all worth it.

As they have moved this work forward, both leaders have evolved their understanding of success. “I’m happy if at the end of a process I look around and there are different people at the table than there were when I started,” said Maya. By partnering with folks both inside and outside of the public sector they are working towards a shared vision of government working on behalf of all people. Giovania reflected in conclusion that they have intentionally decided to work in the public sector in order to “transform the way government works with communities of color, in a way that allows them to identify their vision, support them in achieving collective goals, and co-develop policies and practices that work towards equity and justice.” Our hope is that our network of public servants can emulate these approaches to advance policy and practice that shifts power and creates more racially equitable communities.

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Lessons from the Lockdown in Paris

Laetitia Dablanc is a Director of Research at the University Gustave Eiffel/IFSTTAR and a member of MetroFreight, a VREF Center of excellence in urban freight research. I spoke to her recently about lessons learned from the COVID-19 lockdown in Paris.

My take aways from this 6-min video:

  1. She estimates that the lockdown resulted in a 30% reduction in VMT, but the effect were not lasting. Traffic is already back to pre-lockdown levels in Paris.
  2. The Parisian government rapidly deployed improvements in data management, traffic enforcement, bicycle lanes, and the subsidy for companies acquiring electric vehicles has been doubled – all in the last few months.
  3. The demand for bicycle delivery services (UberEats, etc.) has led to an expansion of gig-based jobs in this sector (and increased use of those new bike lanes!). Laetitia thinks freight companies have an opportunity here to attract these part-time, temporary workers to be full-time, longterm workers in freight if the right training programs can be established.

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CityLab Daily: The Lessons of Holiday Traffic Congestion

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Most of us find it stressful, in addition to its toll on the environment. The annual holiday gridlock exposes America’s utter dependence on automobility like no other holiday—and the failure of the American imagination when it comes to other transportation choices.

Read my take on CityLab: The Lessons of Holiday Traffic Congestion

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Turkeys in Your Neighborhood? Get Used to It.

Wild turkeys have made a remarkable comeback in the U.S. since the early 20th century, leading to more reports of them causing trouble in the neighborhood.

Linda Poon

Taxing Online Sales Won’t Save Cities From the Retail Apocalypse

The Supreme Court’s year-old Wayfair decision allows most U.S. states to collect sales tax from online shopping. Can cities expect a revenue bump?

Liz Farmer

This Thanksgiving, Give Thanks for Public Transit

“Hell is other people,” Sartre wrote, and public transit serves them up aplenty, but chance encounters with unfamiliar folk are the joy of cities. Be thankful.

Lev Kushner

How ‘Blade Runner’ and Sci-Fi Made Everything Dystopian

Science fiction, especially Blade Runner, has spawned so many dystopias that dystopia itself has become banal. We need a new utopianism that embraces the city.

Manu Saadia

What Thanksgiving Costs the Climate Where You Live

How much CO2 did it take to cook a turkey dinner in your state?

John Metcalfe



What We’re Reading

The Paris Agreement needs to be five times stronger to actually work (Grist)

Is American sprawl already bankrupt? (The American Conservative)

What it’s really like to give up plane travel (Curbed)

These robotic dogs have been put to work by at least one police agency (Washington Post)

FEMA’s hurricane aid to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands has stalled (New York Times)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

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The Lessons of Holiday Traffic Congestion

It’s Turkey Time in America, and you know the deal: Prepare for traffic hell.

More than 55 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles away from home for the Thanksgiving holiday, AAA predicts. This figure has been steadily rising; it is, once again, the highest since 2005. About 1.5 million people will be taking trains, buses, and various forms of public transportation to their destinations. Another 4.45 million Americans will fly to friends and family. The rest are driving. As we motor from suburb to suburb, back to little hometowns and over to new retirement communities, Thanksgiving exposes America’s utter dependence on automobility like no other holiday.

The epic congestion this mass migration triggers is as much a Thanksgiving tradition as the tryptophan-induced nap. Those striking photos of bumper-to-bumper-in-both-directions traffic you see next to stories about lane-widenings or War on Cars-themed social media content? This is when they take ‘em.

Traffic! (Nam Y. Huh/AP)

Google Maps has helpfully searched out the best times to leave for the holiday drive, as well as when to avoid grocery runs or shopping trips while roads are near peak capacity. But plenty of Americans say they would gladly give up the driving if there were another way.

About 52 percent of people surveyed by Esurance said they find the Thanksgiving drive at least slightly stressful. The online car insurance company asked people in a somewhat-clunky poll what they would do to avoid it. Stuffed with options, about 32 percent said they would either sacrifice their favorite Thanksgiving dish or help with meal preparation to avoid driving, as if forgoing the pumpkin pie could somehow whip up a high-speed rail network.

But alternative travel choices were also an option: 21 percent said they would rather pay for a flight than drive, and 18 percent said they would happily just skip the holiday altogether. Meanwhile, 26 percent insisted that they would still drive, no matter how terrible traffic got.

Maybe more of us should stay put, as the Huffington Post recently argued. Based on those earlier AAA estimates, there will be at least five billion miles driven to and from our Turkey Day destinations, with cars emitting close to a pound of CO2 per mile driven. Flying’s even more foul, before you get to the table to contemplate the carbon footprint of your turkey. The running estimate, per a 2016 Carnegie Mellon University study, is that “four people who fly 600 miles round trip have a carbon footprint ten times that of an average prepared Thanksgiving meal.” But be nice to your guests: Curbed’s Alissa Walker argues you should redirect your flight shaming towards the elected officials who expanded the airport in the first place. And Thanksgiving’s overall climate impact may get partially counterbalanced by other forces: With two or three days off work, there are a lot of Americans who aren’t making their average daily 30 vehicle miles traveled.

The dissonance of conducting an annual orgy of gravy-and-fuel consumption in a world that can no longer tolerate such profligacy is the focus of a new TV ad from the libertarian think tank Competitive Enterprise Institute. Airing before the Democratic debate on MSNBC, the spot conjured a grim “This Is the Future That Liberals Want” situation by imagining an idyllic suburban home where the family has to haul their turkeys and pies to grandma’s house via scooters, because the Green New Deal has made gas too expensive.

They’re not even electric!

Rasheq Zarif, a mobility consultant at Deloitte, says that the packed roads of Thanksgiving present another danger. When so many multiple millions of people choose (or are forced) to drive at once, it sure seems like the mobility solution we need is another lane or two. “But adding more roads does not solve the problem of congestion,” he says. “It’s a matter of distributing the demand. It should not be expected that we should build more roads and it’s free. It’s a utility, a resource for us, and we need to respect that the same way as we respect energy, water, housing and so forth.” Zarif paraphrases our gluttony for roads with a twist on the popular aphorism about road widening: “When you’re wearing big pants, loosening your belt will not help remind you about weight loss.”

Zarif also cautions that the gridlock we see on holidays cannot take over our imaginations for what’s possible the rest of the year. “Especially when you have these peak periods, resorting to single-occupancy vehicles will not be a solution moving forward,” he says. “We will need to kind of shift towards seeing alternative forms of transportation as viable.”

A lot of that is just about making other options visible. Zarif says he encounters this in his work on shared and autonomous vehicles, where he has to help design “systems on systems” to help people make different choices. Buses, trains, bikes, and yes, scooters, will need to become more legible and appealing to become part of our daily journeys, whether we’re going home from work or home for the holidays. Thanksgiving is a good time to start trying to push that message.

“There’s an opportunity in providing the necessary incentives to change people’s behavior to use these other forms of transportation,” Zarif says. “It’s a lot like another holiday: New Year’s Eve. We discourage drunk driving by offering free services to get people out of their own cars. But we could take that concept to the next level, doing it dynamically, at a larger scale, to reduce congestion.”

So instead of arguing about impeachment around the dinner table tomorrow, argue about congestion pricing. Explain the virtues of road diets during pie. And take a cue from these maniacs who served a Thanksgiving feast on the L train. When it comes to mobility, America is hungry for alternatives.

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Living Our Values as a 21st Century Learning Organization: Lessons from Digital Community Engagement

Living Cities has been exploring and defining what it means to be a 21st century learning organization since its inception in 1991. We have always placed a premium on learning over success. Ben Hecht, our CEO, likes to talk about Living Cities as an “innovation lab” where we test out new ideas to then spread what works to our member institutions and around the country. We began to put a framework on our learning agenda around 2012, when Ben wrote “Leading in a Hyper-Connected World”. The organization began to invest significant resources in knowledge and learning capacities, which included evaluation, communications, and knowledge management.

Living Cities is funded by its members in three-year funding cycles, and for the 2016-2019 round, we decided to refine and focus our learning efforts in the hopes of building a 21st century learning tool: a digital platform that would connect practitioners around the country to help them achieve their results in closing racial income and wealth gaps.

We knew that the social sector needed significant investment in digital infrastructure—similar to the massive connectivity investments of wifi, search engines, and social media of the 2000s. We knew that while we could not undertake the massive investment required to create a digital infrastructure that serves the needs of the social sector, we could create a digital tool that meets the needs of our network, and also test some specific hypotheses in the process to build the understanding of what it takes to use digital technologies to encourage learning and racial equity.

Today we are releasing a new report that details the process and findings from the development of that digital tool. The report outlines the approach and values needed to undertake a digital community engagement effort, and what organizations should consider if they want to be successful with online engagement.

Goals of the Development Process

We intentionally built our digital platform as a series of pilots. To live our values as a 21st century learning organization, we knew that we could not come up with a project plan with rigid time-lines or completely defined goals. Instead, we developed some general questions and set some assumptions:

  • How do we support a community of practice? Understand the scaffolding to put around existing communities of practice that will support the development, spread, and adoption of most promising practices.
  • How do we co-create a platform for sharing? Co-create a digital platform, building on existing technology and networks, for the effective sharing and scaling of solutions.
  • How do we build a repository of solutions? Build a robust, dynamic repository of economic opportunity solutions that is easy to discover.
  • How do we encourage collaboration in our ecosystem? Facilitate purposeful collaboration between Living Cities staff and stakeholders.

What We Learned

To answer these questions, we completed fieldscans of existing digital infrastructure, as well as developed several partnerships with other organizations to understand the needs of our community and how we could meet those needs. These partnerships included Sphaera, the Gates Foundation, Slalom, Context Partners, and Strategic Learning Partners. These partners helped us test what works and what doesn’t to authentically engage our communities.

We learned the following takeaways:

  • For an organization to achieve social impact, it needs to work in an open, networked way. A network of partnerships can help accelerate results through the sharing of learnings and promising practices.

  • The goals and results from any learning efforts need to be centered on racial equity. If learning efforts do not center racial equity, they will disregard the defining reason of inequity in our society.

  • Becoming a 21st century learning organization does not happen overnight. This work takes time and energy and investment to build the required capacity.

  • Part of the investment in becoming a 21st century learning organization is about shifting culture. Many organizations, and many individuals, are not used to working in an open, collaborative, learning environment.

  • Digital engagement cannot be successful without a deep understanding of community needs; it must be done in co-creation with partners.

  • Living Cities and other organizations working on digital community learning platforms are ahead of the curve. It is challenging to be supporting digital engagement in an industry that is still struggling to understand what that means.

You can read more about the project and our lessons learned in our new report.

Contributors to this report included several Living Cities staff members, past and present: Joanna Carrasco; Santiago Carrillo; Shanee Helfer; Shannon Jordy; Julienne Kaleta; Hafizah Omar; Alyssa Smaldino; Carmen Smith.

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Impact vs. Intent: Initial Lessons from Third Sector’s Equity Journey

What does a low-income community look like? What systems and programs, while often well-intentioned, serve as the foot of oppression for keeping this neighborhood economically poor?

After conducting this power analysis as part of the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond’s Undoing Racism Workshop, hosted by Living Cities, there was no denying the immense privilege and power Third Sector has to influence systems and their outcomes for low-income communities and communities of color. This was a wake-up call for us. It helped us to understand the role we potentially play in perpetuating systemic inequities and prompted us to commit ourselves to being vigilant and intentional about how we do our work.

Over the last 18 months, a number of factors, including the power analysis, have led us to realize that we must embrace an equity-centered approach in order to achieve our mission. Because the public and social sectors have a history of racism that leads to disproportionately poor outcomes for communities of color, we cannot ignore the influence of racism on our work. We have committed to upholding Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) and have dedicated significant resources to improving DEI, both internally and externally. This includes sending every staff member to the Undoing Racism Workshop, revisiting our policies and practices, and hosting ongoing trainings and informal conversations. While our journey has not always been easy, we know it is the right journey to be on and want to offer some lessons learned for other organizations who are embarking on their own DEI path, as Living Cities has done for us.

1. Connect DEI to organizational values and ability to achieve mission

Recent staff feedback and guidance from Erika Bernabei of Equity & Results revealed the extent to which we need to more explicitly help team members understand why DEI is critical to us living our values and executing on our mission. We are communicating more proactively, starting with new staff on-boarding. If we want to guide governments to reengineer their systems to produce more positive, equitable results, we must do our work differently. Without an explicit equity focus, outcomes are unlikely to improve and we risk furthering the disparities that do exist.

2. Take a hard look at the role of quantitative and qualitative data in our work

Without an explicit equity focus, outcomes are unlikely to improve and we risk furthering the disparities that do exist.

Data has always been a critical lever for our work. We stress the importance of accessing externally validated datasets, oftentimes collected at the federal or state levels, and using that data to establish baselines and benchmarks in order to measure program impact. However, at government client urging, we realized that it is not enough to simply check the frequency of data collection or reliability of the data quality when taking an equity-centered approach. Disaggregating data based on population characteristics is the first step, but more important is layering qualitative analysis, such as user journey mapping, participatory research, and community focus groups to provide community context and voice to the data insights.

3. Create spaces for personal and interpersonal reflections and growth

Like most folks working in the social sector, our staff have been trained to focus on implementing solutions and measuring progress. It is not surprising that many of our initial DEI efforts have been tangible tactics within recruitment, HR, and project planning. We often fail to give ourselves the necessary time and space to truly grapple with how each of us has been affected by systemic racism. After the Undoing Racism Workshop, we see staff starting to unpack the relationship between the racism that lives in the systems and our individual biases and actions that result from and contribute to systemic racism. We have created spaces for broader discussions and affinity groups to help staff process this personal aspect. There is still an inclination to jump to tools and solutions, but we know this intentionality is the first step in figuring out how we support one another on our individual journeys, which is critical to organizational progress.

4. Stay focused on impact, not intent

We often fail to give ourselves the necessary time and space to truly grapple with how each of us has been affected by systemic racism.

We preach the value of outcomes orientation in government funding and service delivery. Yet, when making changes to improve DEI, it’s easy to abandon our own outcomes orientation. For example, we did not intend for our interview process to filter out the majority of candidates of color in the first round, but a focus on intent alone allowed us to continue perpetuating inequitable practices. Initial data revealed that our recruitment pipeline and process were falling short in helping us hiring more candidates of color. So, we updated our job descriptions and interview process to attract more diverse candidates and to value a wider range of skill sets and experiences. We will keep measuring the impact of these changes and make further adjustments, as needed.

While Third Sector is still far from achieving our goal of becoming an antiracist organization, we are hopeful that our outcomes will soon reflect our efforts. If not, we will continue learning and adapting. Along the way, we are so grateful to learn with and receive support from peers who are also on their own DEI journey and welcome outreach, feedback, and ideas to help us all shift power to communities of color.


Third Sector works with communities nationally to deploy government resources towards positive, long-term outcomes in areas such as housing stability, child development, post-secondary education, workforce and economic mobility, and mental health. Of the many ways to promote improved community outcomes, Third Sector leverages public funding and data to accelerate the transition to a performance-driven social sector.

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5 Lessons for Harnessing Data and Tech to Meet Community Needs

Putting the principle of designing solutions “with, not for” residents into practice can pose a challenge for those working with low-income communities to bridge economic and opportunity gaps. This is particularly true for civic tech and data experts seeking to leverage their distinct expertise to meet pressing community needs and address complex problems. Even after adopting a community-driven approach, making that commitment a reality can be challenging.

In our previous post, we reflected on our experiences as members of a public-private partnership in Seattle/King County. Here, we share five lessons we will carry into the next phase of their work. We hope our experience will help other cities looking to harness civic tech and data in a way that truly addresses community needs:

  1. Start with the problem, not the solution. From the start, we were committed to taking a community-driven approach to identifying a problem amenable to a civic-data-tech solution. But after months of leading with civic data and technology in our pitches to community-based organizations, it became clear that we were essentially offering a treatment, and then going to residents in search of symptoms. In our future work, we will strive to identify a high priority issue first, such as affordable housing, and then examine how data and tech might add value when developing solutions.
  2. Prioritize the community perspective. Projects have the greatest impact when they are built on authentic community values, respecting the diverse languages, educational backgrounds, and identities of those who live, work, and play there. Community voice should be integrated into as much of the project as possible – for example, by hiring or engaging community members in data collection, or by creating a community advisory board that has true oversight and control over the direction of the project.
  3. Build long-term, trusting relationships and commit to a continuing presence in the community. While this kind of relationship-building is ideal, our lean staffing model often forces us to rely on temporary student assistance. When students represent us in the field, we have found it important to assure communities that the relationship will endure beyond a student project. Similarly, community organizations have provided feedback that the impact of one-day “hackathons” is greater when tech developers continue their relationship with the community after the event, and are available to provide some kind of ongoing support. At a minimum, expectations about the length of engagement should be made clear at the beginning of a project.
  4. Offer multiple, structured opportunities to identify priorities, share perspectives about data, and bridge across sectors. Even in this digital age, it is important to build relationships face-to-face, especially when working with communities to reduce disparities. Our future work may include a series of in-person data walks or community cafés, within which neighbors can identify community concerns and discuss ways to address them. As discussions converge on specific issues and “civic data tech” solutions, we can invite relevant partners to join the project.
  5. Identify and nurture a data and technology champion within the community. Having someone with data expertise embedded as a staff member or committed volunteer in a community-based organization can strengthen the roles of data and tech in solving community problems. A good data champion can bridge gaps that might otherwise impede progress, and can advocate for the community in situations where the wealth and expertise of the tech world could create a power imbalance.

While every community is different, we believe these five lessons from Seattle/King County are a good start for anyone supporting collaborations between low-income communities and those who work in data and tech.


Seattle is a participating city in the Civic Tech and Data Collaborative, which harnesses the power of technology and data to make local governments and civic organizations more effective in meeting the pressing challenges of the 21st century. Led by three national organizations – Code for America, Living Cities, and the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership – the Collaborative is a two-year project that provides grants and technical assistance to seven urban communities around the country to improve civic tech and data ecosystems. Funding for this collaborative was made possible with support and partnership from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

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